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Four Years of Science Blogging and Communicating Science!

I almost completely forgot that exactly four years ago today, I launched my blog crystalsandcatalysts.com! 🎊
Four years ago! 

I've not been active on my blog lately, mainly because I'm working on my dissertation and my future career steps after my masters is finally overπŸ•πŸ˜­
Everything blog related is postponed till September, where I'll start blogging about what I've been working on in the past year (also dissertation tips) and things I wish I'd known before starting a masters degree. πŸŽ“

In the meantime I thought I'd share with you, my most read blog posts, the ones you really enjoyed!

Starting off with a series on scientists: Scientist of the week 5: Elsie Widdowson

A bit of psychology... Why do we remember bad memories easier than good ones?

A recent-ish, STS themed post, asking the question: Are we as science communicators, doing our job?

A badly phrased question, to a really important answer: Does the public trust clinical trials?

One for the people who s…

One Paragraph on Green Energy From Grass


Garden grass could become a source of cheap and clean renewable energy, scientists at Cardiff University, UK, have claimed. They have shown that significant amounts of hydrogen can be unlocked from fescue grass with the help of sunlight and a cheap catalyst; hydrogen is contained in enormous quantities all over in the world in water, hydrocarbons and other organic matter and there is a serious need to release hydrogen from these sources in a cheap, efficient and sustainable way. This process is called photoreforming or photocatalysis and involves the sunlight activating the catalyst (metal based: palladium, gold and nickel) which then gets to work on converting cellulose and water into hydrogen− their “results show that significant amounts of hydrogen can be produced using this method with the help of a bit of sunlight and a cheap catalyst”.

[1] Caravaca A. et al,  Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Science, 2016; 472 (2191) [2]

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